Synopsis

Addicted to Altitude

In the late 20th century, Slovak Himalaya mountaineering experienced world successes, but also failures. Through the eyes of one generation of climbers, the two-part Addicted to Altitude documentary shows the evolution of Slovak Himalaya mountaineering from the very first expeditions to the brave attempts on the highest mountain in the world.

Script: PAVOL BARABÁŠ
Cast: VIKTOR BERÁNEK, JAN ČERVINKA, ZOLTÁN DEMJÁN, IVAN FIALA, RÓBERT GÁLFY,
LEOŠ CHLÁDEK, GEJZA HAAK, MICHAL OROLIN, LEOPOLD PÁLENÍČEK,
JAROMÍR STEJSKAL, VLASTIMIL ŠMÍDA, IVAN URBANOVIČ, ĽUDOVÍT ZÁHORANSKÝ
Music: MARTIN BARABÁŠ
Sound: MARTIN MERC
Dramaturgy: RÓBERT VALOVIČ
Photography: PAVOL BARABÁŠ
Directed by: PAVOL BARABÁŠ
Length TV version: 54min. +54 min.
Distribution Format: DCP, BLU RAY, DVD
Genre: documentary
Year of production: 2017
Production: K2studio

vimeo_vabenie_eng1.jpg

Addicted to Altitude, Part I: Ivan Gálfy
Ivan Gálfy left remarkable traces behind, wherever he went: in the Tatras, atop world-class peaks, and in the hearts and minds of many people. As a founding member of the Slovak Mountain Rescue Service and later its chief, Gálfy brought the organisation up to European standards. He pioneered Slovak expedition mountaineering, and his 1971 expedition to Nanga Parbat (Pakistan) was the Eastern Bloc's first successful summiting of an eight-thousander. He organised and led six more Himalaya expeditions, and thanks to him Slovakia was among the world's Himalaya mountaineering elite.

"Upon their return from the first expedition up an eight-thousander, the mountaineers were welcomed by the president, and the whole republic saw them as heroes. What was it that made us Himalayan trendsetters back then? Was it the strength of our team that enabled us to achieve the impossible? Or was it the chance to get out of communist Czechoslovakia? Why doesn't today's generation have the courage to set goals like the ones our mountaineers did a half-century ago? Or have they found other goals? Through his friends' words, we chart the visions of a man who dared to pursue his dreams and ended up inspiring the finest Czechoslovak mountain climbers." (Pavol Barabáš)

V základom tábore po výstupe na Nanga Parbat Účastníci 1. čsl. expedície Hindukuš, 1965 Tábor 3 na Nanga Parbate Transport do doliny Ischmur. Hindukuš, 1965 Prvá čsl. expedícia Hindukuš, 1965

About Ivan Gálfy: cca 700 ascents in the Tatras. Represented Czechoslovakia in mountaineering and from 1954 worked in the Mountain Rescue Service. Chaired the Council of Coaches of Czechoslovakia and the Czechoslovak Mountaineering Union. From 1976 to 2001 worked as Slovak Mountain Rescue Service chief until health-related retirement.

Addicted to Altitude, Part II: Cruel Everest

Mount Everest – the highest mountain on Earth. To some it's just a statistical figure or a place on the map. Yet to others it means everything - life and death. The first man to summit Everest put it very clearly: "Aim high! There's little virtue in easy victory".

"Though mountaineering may seem to be too specific a subject, familiar only to a handful of people, it encompasses much, much more. It isn't just about conquering mountains and boosting one's ego. As Edmund Hillary put it, 'It is not the mountain we conquer, but ourselves."

A thin margin separates victory and defeat – honour and loss. For Slovak Himalayan mountaineering, the 80s were a golden age. In 1984 Slovaks climbed the unconquered south face of Lhotse, which Reinhold Messner - after an unsuccessful assault - had called a project for the next millennium. After gaining international recognition, our mountaineers set their sights on an even higher goal. Cruel Everest documents their frustrated dream of climbing the mountain's most challenging face. Their three gruelling expeditions culminated in the most tragic moments in Slovak mountaineering history. The documentary analyses these Slovaks' attempts on the world's highest peak and reconstructs their stories.

"Although mountaineering may seem a very specific subject, familiar only to few people, it encompasses so much more. It isn't just about conquering mountains and ego building. As Edmund Hillary put it, 'It's not the mountain we conquer, but ourselves'." (Pavol Barabáš)

Základný tábor pod Tirič Mirom, 1967 V tábore Koh -e- Meana, Ivan Urbanovič, Radan Kuchař, Jozef Psotka Tirič Mir Pod vrcholom Koh -e- Meana Mišo Orolin na vrchole Nanga Parbatu, 1971

The realization and distribution of this film was financially supported by the Slovak Audiovisual Fund.

avf.jpg

This film has been produced in a coproduction with Radio and Television of Slovakia.

logo_rtvs_white.png